Buy the Book

Learn how to grow fruits, nuts, mushrooms, and medicine in a productive and sustainably managed woodlot.

CLICK HERE TO ORDER A SIGNED COPY

FarmingtheWoods_frontcover

“At last, a comprehensive forest farming guide for cool temperate climates! The authors have done a superb job explaining forest ecology and describing how to integrate fruits, nuts, mushrooms, medicinals, animals, and more into forest systems. A must-read for anyone interested in agroforestry, forest gardening, or utilizing forests for specialty crops.”

Martin Crawford, author of Creating a Forest Garden

 CLICK HERE TO ORDER A SIGNED COPY

————————————————————————-

Latest blog post:

Tree Saps expand the range, potential of forest farming

 

Tree Saps: Maple, Birch, Walnut, and Sycamore

One of the oldest forms of forest farming comes in the tapping of tree sap for delicious and nutritious products that arrive as the seasons change (thaw) from winter to spring. By far, the most common tree that is tapped in the northeast US is sugar maple, though there are several other trees that warrant attention, depending on the location of a forest farming operation. (See the article: 22 trees you can tap for sap)

Tree saps have long been viewed as a spring tonic by many cultures around the globe. Tree saps are loaded with minerals, nutrients, enzymes, antioxidants, phenolic compounds, and more. Worldwide, there have actually been three International Symposiums on Tree Sap Utilization, (1995, 2000, and 2005) where scientists from Japan, Korea, Russia, and Europe discussed the use of tree sap as an end product – mostly birch.

 

READ ENTIRE POST